O the possibilities of you!

Footprints in the Windsm # 1812

Sooner or later your particles
all go back to random
pieces of all there is
ready to reassemble into something else
O the possibilities of you!


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© c 2018, Learning Works, Incorporated. All rights reserved. Easy reprint permissions: 574/291-0022, or by e-mail to mailto:Footprints AT FootprintsInTheWind.com. Back issues available at http://www.FootprintsintheWind.com

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Published in: | on September 16th, 2018 | No Comments »

Wounds healing you?

Elder, what are the wounds, those that have healed, those that are still healing…your life? What are the profoundest injuries that now are part of your essence? What depths do they help you bring to the world?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 15th, 2018 | No Comments »

Tell me grandchild

Tell me grandchild, what have you learned? It may be, it may be.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 15th, 2018 | No Comments »

“Harvesting” elders

Might we design an alternative “economy” where elders who are already segregated are also “harvested” for “wealth” for the community? Attend the words: “household allotment;” “a festive time of gathering, ripeness and fullness;” and “happiness, well-being, whole, sound.” What is in this For the Grandchildren?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 15th, 2018 | No Comments »

Dotage decrepancy

Dotage, decrepancy, and dementia
are not meant for most

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 15th, 2018 | No Comments »

Secret we keep

Sex is the secret adults keep from children
What is the secret elders keep from adults
Something invisible to those still unripe?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 15th, 2018 | No Comments »

Sex brought death

Sex brought death; gardens brought old people.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 14th, 2018 | No Comments »

Better at puzzles

Who’s better at puzzles: children, adults, elders? Elders are themselves a puzzle: their very existence asks What now? More tellingly, What next?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 14th, 2018 | No Comments »

To whom contribute?

We have added 30 years; we have scattered our adult children: to whom will we contribute and what?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 14th, 2018 | No Comments »

Too sick and weak

We were hunter-gatherers following the seasons and food. So we left behind those too sick and weak to keep up. We became farmers, had much food and shelter. So we took care for these. Now we are mobile, scattered. So…what?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 14th, 2018 | No Comments »

To wish not to be a burden

To wish to not be a burden on your children is at root selfish. For will you be abandoned if you are too much burden? Yet your son’s soul goes out to you and your daughter needs to mother you. Your selfishness denies them their hearts.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 14th, 2018 | No Comments »

Families scatter

Hunter-gatherers lose their elders when they can no longer keep up with the moving band. Agrarian communities gain elders by staying put. They have supplies of food and existing shelter, so longevity is allowed extension. Now our families scatter on the four winds; will we again leave our elders behind? It falls to us to make these years most valuable For the Grandchildren.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 13th, 2018 | No Comments »

Who then?

If the body is healthy, the soul is expanding, and we have an extra 30 years, who then?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 13th, 2018 | No Comments »

Eldering never bloomed

Eldering might never have bloomed—yet. With our rapidly expanding life spans, we are now given an opening and necessity to invent our role.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 13th, 2018 | No Comments »

Wrap stories in stories

Let us learn ways
to wrap stories in stories
to sneak lessons deep inside lessons

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 13th, 2018 | No Comments »

Caring defines humans

Caring for one another is what defines us as humans, what opens up our worlds.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 13th, 2018 | No Comments »

Footprints in the Windsm # 1811–To use this voice

Footprints in the Windsm # 1811

To use this voice is to grow this love.


Please pass it on.

© c 2018, Learning Works, Incorporated. All rights reserved. Easy reprint permissions: 574/291-0022, or by e-mail to mailto:Footprints AT FootprintsInTheWind.com. Back issues available at http://www.FootprintsintheWind.com

Please publish in your print or electronic periodical, with the above info.
To subscribe, send an e-mail with the word “subscribe” to mailto:Footprints AT FootprintsInTheWind.com

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

“Older adult” epithet

The term “older adult” is a misunderstanding if not an ill considered epithet.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

Growing cosmos

Grandparenting means helping the cosmos grow.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

Given age what

Most are given age; what will we do with it?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

Youngsters and oldsters

We have youngsters; what if we had oldsters? What would they be to the rest of us, how would they act? Would they be mates of the youngsters, sharers of play? How would they relate with the elders? What other sorts and roles of the chronologically advanced would we see if we’d look?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

science of deeper forms

In What Are Old People For? Bill Thomas observes that the pre-frontal cortex (he says the locus of the monkey mind) shrinks and so he speculates that we grow ever more capable of deeper forms of meditation and contemplation. This shows the science to what the poem “Modern Magellans” starts unfolding.

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 12th, 2018 | No Comments »

Infirm purposive light

Reading in Bill Thomas’s In the Arms of Elders, I was struck by his observation that the most infirm among us teach us the most important thing: community. They teach us caring.

This is an important leaping off place. There ought to be more, methinks: for one, this is a passive, non-purposive approach. It opens the door for sure. Those who have difficulty walking, talking, and thinking, are yet praying for the rest of us, holding us and all there is in light. How to be purposive in this light?

:- Doug.

Published in: | on September 11th, 2018 | No Comments »